Publications of the Chair

Credit Risk Sensitivity to Carbon Price

2022
Authors :
Vincent Bouchet and Theo Le Guenedal

Based on the 2018 Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change scenarios, this article studies the credit risk sensitivity of 795 international companies to carbon prices.

Enhancing financial transparency to mitigate climate change: Towards a Climate Risks and Opportunities Reporting Index

2022
Authors :
Jeanne Amar, Samira Demaria, Sandra Rigot

Using the IPCC (2018) medium (2024) and long-term (2060) scenarios, this study analyzes the credit risk sensitivity of 763 international companies.

Financing green mobility Is it enough and where does it go?

2022
Authors :
Jean-Pierre Ponssard

On Dec 9-10, 2021, the annual International Conference on Mobility Challenges provided an outstanding opportunity to bring together researchers, industry experts and policy makers to discuss these issues. This note gives a summary of the debate.

Why local initiatives for the energy transition should coordinate. The case of cities for fuel cell buses in Europe

2020
Authors :
Guy Meunier, Lucie Moulin, Jean-Pierre Ponssard

Article accepted in the Revue d’Economie Industrielle Hydrogen is a possible alternative to the internal combustion engine, alongside battery-powered vehicles, in the context of reducing greenhouse...  

The climate consistency goal and the transformation of global finance

2021
Authors :
Luis H. Zamarioli, Pieter Pauw, Michael König and Hugues Chenet

In this article, we build on four methods to show that Art. 2.1(c) of the Paris Agreement comprises a new meaning of ‘finance’ under the United Nations negotiations. Implementation of Art. 2.1(c) requires engagement by governments and non-state actors, including the financial sector. 

An assessment of the European regulation on battery recycling for electric vehicles

2021
Authors :
Quentin Hoarau et Etienne Lorang

This paper investigates the design of a recent regulatory proposal aimed at favoring the emergence of a
battery recycling industry in Europe. It develops a material flow model that projects battery wastes and their recycling potential. Our findings indicate that the feasibility of the European Commission proposed thresholds is not very sensitive to changes of material intensities...

Côte d’Ivoire’s electricity challenge in 2050: Reconciling economic development and climate commitments

2021
Authors :
Edi Assoumou and Florent Mc Isaac

In closing its economic gap with emerging markets, Côte d’Ivoire will face a substantial increase in electricity demand over the next three decades. This paper develops a forward-looking tool to explore electricity technology investment paths compatible with both rapidly increasing electricity demand and the Paris Agreement.

Deepening the territorial Life Cycle Assessment approach with partial equilibrium modelling: First insights from an application to a wood energy incentive in a French region

2021
Authors :
T. Beaussier, S. Caurla, V. Bellon-Maurel, P. Delacote, E. Loiseau

An innovative modelling framework and metrics are developed to assess the economic and environmental performances of regional incentives in the wood energy sector. Our approach is based on the coupling between a partial equilibrium economic model of the forest sector with Life Cycle Assessment (LCA). Its originality relies on the computation of regional eco-efficiency...

How to re-conceptualise and re-integrate climate finance into society through ecological accounting?

2020
Authors :
Hugues Chenet, Alexandre Rambaud

We propose an exploratory and theoretical study which introduces how and why a particular and innovative ecological accounting approach, the CARE model, currently called upon by a growing number of practitioners and researchers, is a relevant framework to re-conceptualise the issue of climate finance

Expenditure elasticity and income elasticity of GHG emissions: A survey of literature on household carbon footprint

2021
Authors :
Antonin Pottier

The article examines the relationship between a household's income and its carbon emissions (the carbon footprint). It is found that, generally, the carbon footprint grows less rapidly than expenditure, and confirms that the income elasticity is lower than the expenditure elasticity